Super Brave Story of Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam, saving lives: Doctor’s day special

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Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam, a young Indian doctor who volunteered to spend four weeks in West Africa helping those suffering and dying of Ebola.
Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam, a young Indian doctor who volunteered to spend four weeks in West Africa helping those suffering and dying of Ebola.

India has shown remarkable improvements in the medical field and July 1 pays a perfect tribute to all the doctors who have made relentless efforts towards achieving this goal irrespective of the odds.
Why is it celebrated on July 1 in India? Doctor’s Day in India was established by the Government of India in 1991 to be recognized and celebrated every year on 1st of July as National Doctors day. It is celebrated on 1st of July on the birth and death anniversary of the most famous physician of India Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy (Dr B C Roy).

Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam

‘Ebola is a highly infectious disease with high mortality. The key point is not to panic.’

‘I like working where there is an acute, desperate need for medical care in a vulnerable population and in emergency contexts.’

Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam, a young Indian doctor who volunteered to spend four weeks in West Africa helping those suffering and dying of Ebola,

While her family parents, sister, nephews was bringing in Dussehra, and later Diwali, last month in Madurai, Kalyani Gomathinayagam was one and a half continents away in Foya, a border town in central Liberia, valiantly struggling through her Ebola-affected patient load.

Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam
Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam

She was one of the few doctors, and likely the only Indian, who had volunteered to work in that region treating victims of the awful epidemic.

At the Medecins Sans Frontieres-run makeshift tent hospital, image, below, she and her colleagues — they were three doctors and 125 medical personnel on the team — in their cumbersome special protective gear, horribly stifling in the West African heat, were planning the daily rounds of their 100-120 patients.

The international Nobel-winning humanitarian medical organisation — that operates without borders offering aid to casualties of disaster, war and disease — had chosen to beef up medical facilities in Foya, in addition to capital Monrovia, because that was where the scourge started in Liberia, due to its proximity to Guinea and Sierra Leone. The 2014 west African epidemic of Ebola began in Guinea with a two-year-old boy reported being the first case.

Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam:- fight againstebola
Dr Kalyani Gomathinayagam:- fight against Ebola

Unlike in a regular hospital in the normal environment, at the Medecins Sans Frontieres outpost, which the team started up and organised, an ordinary medical routine like meeting and examining patients, once a day, is an enormous challenge when they are suffering from the deadly hemorrhagic fever brought on by the Ebola virus. No medical staff can be within the high-risk areas where confirmed or suspected cases are located, for more than one hour or so, and rounds begin as early as 7 am after a careful assignment of hourly duties.

Further, Kalyani explains: “(Ebola) changes the patient-doctor dynamic. You as a doctor will not be able to see the patient face-to-face. The patient will not be able to see you much, because you are behind the protective gear. He can only hear you and see your eyes…”

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