Foxes Make 40 Different Sounds:- Know More Amazing Facts Here

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Foxes Make 40 Different Sounds:- Know More Amazing Facts Here

Foxes are fascinating animals, and that’s why we’re counting down our favourite fun facts about them! Which fox fact is your favourite? Leave us a comment to cast your vote.

Foxes Use The Earth’s Magnetic Field

Like a guided missile, the fox harnesses the earth’s magnetic field to hunt. Other animals, like birds, sharks, and turtles, have this “magnetic sense,” but the fox is the first one we’ve discovered that uses it to catch prey.

According to New Scientist, the fox can see the earth’s magnetic field as a “ring of shadow” on its eyes that darkens as it heads towards magnetic north. When the shadow and the sound the prey is making line up, it’s time to pounce. Here’s the fox in action:

http://https://youtu.be/D2SoGHFM18I

Foxes Are Good Parents

Foxes reproduce once a year. Litters range from one to 11 pups (the average is six), which are born blind and don’t open their eyes until nine days after birth. During that time, they stay with the vixen (female) in the den while the dog (male) brings them food. They live with their parents until they’re seven months old. The vixen protects her pups with surprising loyalty. Recently, a fox pup was caught in a trap in England for two weeks but survived because its mother brought it food every day.

The Smallest Fox Weighs 3 Pounds

Roughly the size of a kitten, the fennec fox has elongated ears and a creamy coat. It lives in the Sahara Desert, where it sleeps during the day to protect it from the searing heat. Its ears not only allow it to hear prey, they also radiate body heat, which keeps the fox cool. Its paws are covered with fur so that the fox can walk on the hot sand like it’s wearing snowshoes.

Foxes Are Playful

Foxes are known to be friendly and curious. They play among themselves as well as with other animals like cats and dogs. They love balls, which they frequently steal from golf courses.

fox cubs
fox cubs

Arctic Foxes Don’t Shiver Until –70 degrees Celsius

The arctic fox, which lives in the northernmost areas of the hemisphere, can handle cold better than most animals on earth. It doesn’t even get cold until –70 degrees Celsius. Its white coat also camouflages it against predators. As the seasons change, the coat changes too, turning brown or grey so the fox can blend in with the rocks and dirt of the tundra.

Bat-eared Foxes Listen For Insects

The bat-eared fox is aptly named, not just because of its 5-inch ears, but because of what it uses those ears for—like the bat, it listens for insects. On a typical night, the fox walks along the African Savannah, listening, until it hears the scuttle of prey. Although the fox eats a variety of insects and lizards, most of its diet is made up of termites. In fact, the bat-eared fox often makes its home in termite mounds, which it usually cleans out of inhabitants before moving in.

Foxes Sound Like This

Foxes make 40 different sounds, some of which you can listen to here. The most startling is the scream:

http://https://youtu.be/zk1mAd77Hr4

 

 

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