WORLD YOUTH SKILLS DAY: Be the part of it #SkillsChangeLives #SkillsMakesYou

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Rising youth unemployment is one of the most significant problems facing economies and societies in today’s world, for developed and developing countries alike.
Rising youth unemployment is one of the most significant problems facing economies and societies in today’s world, for developed and developing countries alike.

Young people are almost three times more likely to be unemployed than adults and continuously exposed to the lower quality of jobs, greater labour market inequalities, and longer and more insecure school-to-work transitions. In addition, women are more likely to be underemployed and underpaid, and to undertake part-time jobs or work under temporary contracts.

That is why education and training are key determinants of success in the labour market. But unfortunately, existing systems are failing to address the learning needs of many young people, and surveys of learning outcomes and skills show that a large number of youth have low levels of achievement in basic literacy and numeracy. To raise awareness on the importance of investing in youth skills development, the United Nations General Assembly decided in resolution A/RES/69/145 to designate 15 July as World Youth Skills Day.

World Youth Skills Day
World Youth Skills Day

Why is the World Youth Skills Day important?

Rising youth unemployment is one of the most significant problems facing economies and societies in today’s world, for developed and developing countries alike. At least 475 million new jobs need to be created over the next decade to absorb the 73 million youth currently unemployed and the 40 million new annual entrants to the labour market. At the same time, OECD surveys suggest that both employers and youth consider that many graduates are ill-prepared for the world of work.

Attaining decent work is a significant challenge. In many countries, the informal sector and traditional rural sector remains a major source of employment. The number of workers in vulnerable employment currently stands at 1.44 billion worldwide. Workers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia account for more than half this number, with three out of four workers in these regions subject to vulnerable employment conditions.

The international community has set an ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It calls for an integrated approach to development which recognises that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions; combating inequality within and among countries; preserving the planet; creating inclusive and sustainable economic growth; achieving full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men; and ensuring full gender equality and fostering social inclusion, are interdependent.

 WORLD YOUTH SKILLS DAY

WorldSkills is proud to recognize World Youth Skills Day (WYSD) on 15 July 2018! Use #SkillsChangeLives and #WYSD to join WorldSkills and the United Nations, to raise awareness on the importance of youth developing skills.

We believe #SkillsChangeLives. Through the power of skills individuals, communities, and countries are propelled towards a more prosperous future.

Did you know…

With the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and UNESCO’s Education for All (EFA) campaign coming to their term in 2015, more young people than ever around the world have gained access to education. This has sparked career expectations and raised hopes for a better future in many young people. Education, skills and jobs are rated high in people’s priorities for development: in the global My World 2015 Survey, young people up to the age of 30 across all regions and education levels rated education as their number one priority, with better job opportunities being the third priority.

  • Youth represent 25% of the total working age population but make up 40% of the unemployed (ILO, FAO, 2013).
  • Almost 74 million young people (aged 15 to 24) were looking for work in 2014 (ILO, 2015).
  • Two-thirds of youth in developing economies are without work, not studying, or engaged in irregular or informal employment (UNDP, 2014).
  • Never before have there been so many young people on the planet: 1.8 billion people are aged 10 to 24 (UNFPA, 2014).
  • The working-age population is poised to more than double in the least-developed countries, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa between 2015 and 2050 (UNFPA, 2014).
  • The youth unemployment situation is common to all regions in the world and is happening despite improvements in average educational attainment (ILO, 2015).

 

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