Children, HIV and AIDS: The world in 2030

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A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.
A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.

The world pledged to end AIDS by 2030. While we have seen remarkable progress in the past decade among children aged 0-9 years, adolescents have been left behind in HIV prevention efforts. A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.

On World AIDS Day 2018, UNICEF is releasing global and regional snapshots of the world today and a new analysis of the situation for children and adolescents projected to 2030.

The world today: Global and regional snapshots

  • 3.0 million children and adolescents are living with HIV
  • 430,000 children and adolescents became newly infected with the virus in 2017
  • 130,000 children and adolescents died from AIDS-related causes in 2017

The world in 2030

  • 1.9 million children and adolescents are projected to be living with HIV
  • 270,000 children and adolescents are projected to become newly infected with the virus annually
  • 56,000 children and adolescents are projected to die from AIDS-related causes annually
  • 2.0 million new HIV infections could be averted between 2018 and 2030 if global goals are met – 1.5 million of these would be averted among adolescents

Wear gloves:

  • When you have open or healing wounds, or skin infections.
  • When in contact with blood or body fluids, secretions, excretions or non-intact skin.
  • When in contact with surfaces or articles contaminated with blood or body fluids.
  • When performing venipuncture or other vascular access procedures.
  • When carrying out cleaning or decontamination procedures.

Replace torn or punctured gloves immediately.

Use new gloves for every patient.

 

Precautions are the only Cure

Wear protective eye wear, masks or face shields (with safety glasses or goggles) during procedures likely to generate droplets of blood or body fluids.

In general, protective eye wear, masks and clothing are not needed for routine care of AIDS virus-infected persons.

Wear gowns when the splashing of blood or body fluids may occur.

Wash hands:

  • Before and after direct patient contact.
  • Immediately and thoroughly when contaminated by blood or body fluids.
  • After removing gloves.
  • After a glove tear or suspected glove leak.
  • Before leaving a work area.

The use of gloves does not eliminate the need for hand washing. Hand washing is one of the most important procedures for the prevention of transmission.

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